YOUR SUPPORT HAS LET US 

DO AMAZING THINGS.

THE PROJECT

MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY:

The Lee Smith Research Foundation has helped fund many different areas at Middlesex University Including:

 Our scientist Dr. Song Wen’s research career was powerfully boosted by generous grants from the Lee Smith Foundation, which helped to uncover the very important role of a tumour-derived special form of the pregnancy hormone hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin – which is responsible for the ‘blue’ pregnancy test) in increasing the aggressiveness and spread of the cancer, and in suppressing any protective immune response.  This work has provided the nucleus for the formation of a collaborative group of staff members which is establish their hCG work as a major contributor in the cancer research area. Support from the Foundation has contributed to Song’s appointment and subsequent promotion to University Senior Lecturer staff status.  She is now making interesting contributions to potential treatments of cervical cancer, initiated by the high risk human papilloma virus (HPV).  

The Foundation is also currently supporting the development of an early lung cancer diagnostic test for use in doctors’ clinics which would prevent the delay and extra cost of sending blood away for lab testing.  The device will use the technique patented by NALIA (a small spin-off company of which Professor Roitt is Chief Scientist) in which a pin-prick of blood is added to a well which can test for many different biomarkers, each of which is normally assayed in a single test.  By identifying a larger number of biomarkers, we have produced a ‘signature pattern’ giving positive results in 80% of patients and we are trying to improve on this.

 
GREAT ORMAND STREET HOSPITAL:

The Lee Smith Research Foundation has helped fund the work and research of Professor Adrian Thrasher's in the key areas of immune deficiencies associated with the treatment of Leukaemia and HIV. 

Professor Thrasher clinical interests are the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiency. His specialist interests are in the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS), disorders of innate immunity, and Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome.  His team at UCL GOS ICH/GOSH are conducting trials of somatic gene therapy for various forms of PID including SCID-X1, CGD, ADA-SCID, and WAS. Research interests include the pathophysiology of primary immunodeficiency syndromes especially WAS, the actin cytoskeleton in haematopoietic cells, the development of somatic gene therapy, and thymus transplantation. This research will hopefully provide a broad platform for future oncological treatments across many different cancers. 

THE PROJECTS
OUR PARTNERS